Flow Imaging Microscopy Blog

FlowCam can assess effects of mechanical stress (aggregation) on protein formulations in syringes resulting from hospital transportation systems.

University of Colorado PhD student, Vaida Linkuviene, along with Fluid Imaging Applications Scientist, Heather Anne Wright, and Co-Director of the Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology at the University of Colorado, John Carpenter, recently presented a poster at the 2019 Colorado Protein Stability Conference, at which Fluid Imaging has long been a participant. Vaida has been working with the FlowCam to assess the effects mechanical stress on protein formulations in syringes.

Pictured here: Vaida with her poster "Effects of transportation of syringes containing protein formulations through a hospital pneumatic tube system: Particle characterization by multiple methods"

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Topics: Protein Therapeutics, User Spotlight, Biopharmaceutical Research

Therapeutic Proteins Can Save Lives: Nano-Flow Imaging Helps Make These Drugs Safer

The positive impacts of therapeutic proteins on the lives of people suffering from cancer, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, ALS, lupus, arthritis and other diseases and conditions have attracted significant investment in drug research and development.

As a result, hundreds of therapeutic protein-based drugs have earned FDA approval, with enormous benefits to human health. With the rapid growth and acceptance of these biologics, more and more information about impacts of product quality on patient outcomes has become available. Based on this growing body of evidence, one of the most important product quality attributes is the concentration and sizes of subvisible particles.

"Lives are on the line when it comes to correct understanding of how therapeutic proteins can form particulate" says Professor John Carpenter, PhD, Professor of  Pharmaceutical Sciences and Co-Director of the Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology at the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Read the entire article in Laboratory News

Click the infographic on the right to view larger

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Topics: Protein Therapeutics, Biopharmaceutical Research, Nanoparticles

FlowCam Compares Favorably to MFI and Light Obscuration: Collaborative Study by Japanese Biopharmaceutical Consortium

Currently the compendial method for quantifying subvisible particles equal to or greater than 10 µm and 25 µm uses light obscuration (LO), which is internationally harmonized in the U.S., European, and  Japanese Pharmacopoeia. However, numerous reports have indicated that subvisible particles smaller than 10 µm could elicit immune responses.

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Topics: Protein Therapeutics, Biopharmaceutical Research

UNE Researchers Use FlowCam to Study Engineered Proteins

A class of engineered proteins called elastin-like polymers (ELP) have shown promise for advanced drug delivery applications. In order to fully realize their potential however, they need to be rigorously characterized  to determine how they behave in different environments. The FlowCam is ideally suited to help with the characterization process.

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Topics: Protein Therapeutics, FlowCam Technology, Biopharmaceutical Research

FlowCam Provides Visualization of Lycopodium Plant Sporoderm Microcapsule Degradation in Human Blood Plasma.

Plant sporoderm are among the most robust biomaterials in nature. The spore/pollen cell material can be easily extracted leaving an excellent natural microcapsule that can serve as a potential drug delivery mechanism for different biopharmaceutical applications.  See related post on dandelion pollen in a similar application. 

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Topics: Microencapsulation, Biopharmaceutical Research

We are attending the European Workshop on Protein Aggregation and Immunogenicity

The 4th Annual European Workshop on Protein Aggregation and Immunogenicity will be held in Salzburg-Wals, Austria on January 28 and 29.  This conference serves as a European summit for thought leaders and academic researchers to come together and discuss the issues of protein aggregation and its effects on the immunogenicity of therapeutic protein drug products. We are excited to attend and exhibit the FlowCam imaging particle analyzer with our German distributor, Anasysta.

Proteins and contaminants from a parenteral drug sample, imaged and analyzed by the FlowCam.

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Topics: News and Events, Biopharmaceutical Research, Nanoparticles

Biotherapeutic Reformulation Achieved Through Extended Particle Analysis

Proteinaceous particles in parenteral drugs pose an immunogenic risk. These formulations are therefore rigorously characterized for optimal conformational and colloidal stability of the drug molecule. As such, they undergo thorough analysis of biophysical descriptors and extended particle characterization to ensure a safe and stable product is delivered to market with a shelf life of about two years. In this post, we summarize a recent paper by Mattison et al. (2018) published in BioProcess International on how they successfully reformulated biotherapeutics by using quantitative stability predictors and descriptors. 

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Topics: Protein Therapeutics, User Spotlight, Biopharmaceutical Research

Most Popular Flow Imaging Microscopy Blog Posts of 2018

We use our Flow Imaging Microscopy blog as a platform to serve up the latest in relevant news, highlight novel uses of the FlowCam, and announce FlowCam technology developments. This year we blogged about 54 different topics. Below is a recap of the Top 10 Most Read Blog Posts of 2018. 

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Topics: Protein Therapeutics, Marine Research, News and Events, Harmful Algal Blooms, FlowCam Technology, Aquatic Research, Biopharmaceutical Research

FlowCam for the Continuous Improvement of Manufacturing Process: A Case Study

A client in the biopharmaceutical market recently learned how the FlowCam is perfectly suited to visualize translucent plastic particles that may enter into their production process. They were frustrated with traditional microscopy that was not effective at visualizing microparticles. They turned to the FlowCam to troubleshoot their manufacturing process and were able to compare old and new data sets allowing for continuous improvement.

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Topics: Industrial Applications, User Spotlight, Biopharmaceutical Research

New High-Throughput Method for Elastin-like Polymer (ELP) Coacervate Analysis

December 2018 — A recent study by researchers from the University of New England and University of New Hampshire has demonstrated that flow imaging microscopy is an accurate, more efficient, and more informative method of elastin-like polymer (ELP) coacervate analysis than standard methods. ELP coacervates are a class of molecules with promising applications in drug delivery vehicles, tissue engineering, environmental remediation, and more. ELP coacervate architecture is stimuli-responsive and highly tunable, making them ideal for the above-mentioned applications.  


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Topics: Industrial Applications, User Spotlight, Biopharmaceutical Research, Nanoparticles