Flow Imaging Microscopy Blog

Cybele Brooks

Recent Posts

FlowCam Identifies Transparent Particles Shedding from Medical Devices

Cardiovascular implants, such as drug coated balloons or drug eluting stents used to treat coronary artery disease are subject to rigorous testing for safety. The assessment of particles released from such devices is essential in the approval of these types of coated medical devices because particles released into the blood stream can increase the risk of emboli. In this study the FlowCam was used to count and analyze particles collected during simulated tests, and these results were compared to light obscuration particle counting.
Pictured at right, FlowCam images with different threshold values.

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Topics: News and Events, FlowCam Technology, Biopharmaceutical Research

Celebrating 20 Years in Business: Special Delivery of New FlowCams to Bigelow Labs

As part of our 20th anniversary celebration, all 30 Fluid Imaging employees traveled together to hand-deliver two new FlowCam instruments to the lab where the FlowCam was invented, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences (BLOS) in East Boothbay, Maine.

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Topics: News and Events, Harmful Algal Blooms, FlowCam Technology

FlowCam at Bigelow Labs: Flow Imaging vs Manual Microscopy and the study of HABs

Every summer since 2015 scientists from around the country have come to Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in East Boothbay, Maine to be trained in harmful algae taxonomy and identification. This training course project is part of NOAA NCCOS’s Monitoring and Event Response for Harmful Algal Blooms (MERHAB) program and is lead by Dr. Michael Lomas.  Bigelow provides the theoretical and hands-on training to our next generation of HAB scientists so that they have the proper tools to effectively and accurately identify HAB species.

Pictured here: phyto- and zooplankton imaged by the FlowCam off the Maine coast

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Topics: Harmful Algal Blooms, Aquatic Research

What is that Algal Bloom in Casco Bay?

Yesterday Heather Anne Wright and I were invited to join the Friends of Casco Bay on a mission to track down and capture samples of the algae bloom taking place in Casco Bay.  Mike Doan skippered the Baykeeper, while Will Everitt and Ivy Fignoca accompanied the group this afternoon on a ride out to Chebeague Island.

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Topics: Marine Research, Invasive Species, Harmful Algal Blooms, Aquatic Research

Therapeutic Proteins Can Save Lives: Nano-Flow Imaging Helps Make These Drugs Safer

The positive impacts of therapeutic proteins on the lives of people suffering from cancer, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, ALS, lupus, arthritis and other diseases and conditions have attracted significant investment in drug research and development.

As a result, hundreds of therapeutic protein-based drugs have earned FDA approval, with enormous benefits to human health. With the rapid growth and acceptance of these biologics, more and more information about impacts of product quality on patient outcomes has become available. Based on this growing body of evidence, one of the most important product quality attributes is the concentration and sizes of subvisible particles.

"Lives are on the line when it comes to correct understanding of how therapeutic proteins can form particulate" says Professor John Carpenter, PhD, Professor of  Pharmaceutical Sciences and Co-Director of the Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology at the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Read the entire article in Laboratory News

Click the infographic on the right to view larger

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Topics: Protein Therapeutics, Biopharmaceutical Research, Nanoparticles

FlowCam Compares Favorably to MFI and Light Obscuration: Collaborative Study by Japanese Biopharmaceutical Consortium

Currently the compendial method for quantifying subvisible particles equal to or greater than 10 µm and 25 µm uses light obscuration (LO), which is internationally harmonized in the U.S., European, and  Japanese Pharmacopoeia. However, numerous reports have indicated that subvisible particles smaller than 10 µm could elicit immune responses.

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Topics: Protein Therapeutics, Biopharmaceutical Research

See the FlowCam at Powder & Bulk Solids Toronto, June 4th

Flow Imaging Microscopy has revolutionized particle analysis by offering qualitative, morphological analysis in addition to quantitative analysis (count and size). 

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Topics: Industrial Applications, News and Events, FlowCam Technology

UNE Researchers Use FlowCam to Study Engineered Proteins

A class of engineered proteins called elastin-like polymers (ELP) have shown promise for advanced drug delivery applications. In order to fully realize their potential however, they need to be rigorously characterized  to determine how they behave in different environments. The FlowCam is ideally suited to help with the characterization process.

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Topics: Protein Therapeutics, FlowCam Technology, Biopharmaceutical Research

FlowCam Technical Customer Support Team Travels to Asia

Fluid Imaging Technologies offers hands on training after the purchase of a FlowCam particle analyzer, or as refresher training for existing customers.  We partner with international distributors to assist in local language, shipping and training logistics, as well as to provide a local presence in the country and enhance the sales process.  Throughout January and March, Stephen Barton and Kay Johnson traveled extensively throughout Asia.

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Topics: News and Events

FlowCam Provides Visualization of Lycopodium Plant Sporoderm Microcapsule Degradation in Human Blood Plasma.

Plant sporoderm are among the most robust biomaterials in nature. The spore/pollen cell material can be easily extracted leaving an excellent natural microcapsule that can serve as a potential drug delivery mechanism for different biopharmaceutical applications.  See related post on dandelion pollen in a similar application. 

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Topics: Microencapsulation, Biopharmaceutical Research